Journal Article

Seston effects on faecal pellet carbon concentrations from a mixed community of copepods in Balsfjord, Norway, and the Antarctic Polar Front

Juanita Urban-Rich

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 58, issue 3, pages 700-710
Published in print January 2001 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2001 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1006/jmsc.2000.1055
Seston effects on faecal pellet carbon concentrations from a mixed community of copepods in Balsfjord, Norway, and the Antarctic Polar Front

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The effects of phytoplankton community composition on faecal pellet carbon concentrations from a mixed community of large (>500 μm) copepods were examined in studies in two areas: Balsfjord, Norway, and the Pacific sector of the Antarctic Polar Front. The Balsfjord study was conducted during the spring bloom of 1994. Faecal pellet production rates, dry weights and total amino acid carbon concentrations were positively correlated with chlorophyll concentrations. However, faecal pellet carbon concentrations were not correlated to chlorophyll levels but rather appeared related to the phytoplankton community composition. Lower faecal pellet carbon concentrations were consistently found when diatoms constituted >50% of the available plankton. Similar results were found in the Antarctic Polar Front study, which was conducted during the austral spring and summer of 1997–1998. Over spring and summer, faecal pellet carbon concentrations were negatively correlated with particulate biogenic silica concentrations. Results from both of these field studies suggest that, on a community level, the diet of copepods affects the carbon concentration of the pellets and thus the potential flux of carbon via faecal pellets.

Keywords: amino acid carbon; Antarctic; Balsfjord; copepod faecal pellets; pellet carbon; pellet production rates

Journal Article.  0 words. 

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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