Journal Article

Reconstruction of environmental histories to investigate patterns of larval radiated shanny (<i>Ulvaria subbifurcata</i>) growth and selective survival in a large bay of Newfoundland

Hannes Baumann, Pierre Pepin, Fraser J.M Davidson, Fran Mowbray, Dietrich Schnack and John F Dower

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 60, issue 2, pages 243-258
Published in print January 2003 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2003 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1054-3139(03)00019-5
Reconstruction of environmental histories to investigate patterns of larval radiated shanny (Ulvaria subbifurcata) growth and selective survival in a large bay of Newfoundland

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We used otolith microstructure analysis to reconstruct the growth histories of larval radiated shanny (Ulvaria subbifurcata) collected over a 2-week period in Trinity Bay, Newfoundland. A dynamic 3-dimensional, eddy-resolving circulation model of the region provided larval drift patterns, which were combined with measurements of temperature and zooplankton abundance to assess the environmental history of the larvae. The abundance of juvenile and adult capelin (Mallotus villosus), the dominant planktivorous fish in this area, was monitored using five hydroacoustic surveys. The goal was to determine whether environmental histories are helpful in explaining spatial and temporal differences in larval shanny growth, measured as cumulative distribution functions (CDF) of growth rates. We found evidence for a selective loss of slower growing individuals and recognized considerable spatial differences in the CDF of larval growth rates. Consistent patterns in capelin abundance suggested that faster growing survivors, sampled at the end of the 2-week period, developed in areas of low predator densities. A dome-shaped relationship between temperature and larval growth was observed, explaining a significant but small amount of the overall variability (14%). Effects of experienced prey concentrations on larval growth rates could not be demonstrated.

Keywords: process study; otolith microstructure analysis; selective mortality; parabolic growth model

Journal Article.  8157 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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