Journal Article

Diurnal changes in the acoustic-frequency characteristics of Japanese anchovy (<i>Engraulis japonicus</i>) post-larvae “shirasu” inferred from theoretical scattering models

Kazushi Miyashita

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 60, issue 3, pages 532-537
Published in print January 2003 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2003 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1054-3139(03)00066-3
Diurnal changes in the acoustic-frequency characteristics of Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) post-larvae “shirasu” inferred from theoretical scattering models

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Diurnal changes in the acoustic-frequency characteristics of “shirasu”, a post-larval stage of Japanese anchovy (Engraulis japonicus), were analysed based on theoretical scattering models. Since post-larval swimbladders contain gas at night but not during the day, the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA), based on the deformed-cylinder model, which assumes there is no gas in the swimbladder, was applied to daytime observations, and the fish-bladder resonance model, which assumes there is gas in the swimbladder, to those taken at night. The two sets of acoustic frequencies employed were 50 and 200 kHz, which are those used for shirasu commercial fishing, and 38 and 120 kHz, which are usually employed for acoustic surveys using a quantitative echosounder. During the daytime, differences in shirasu target strengths between the two frequencies were large, especially between 38 and 120 kHz, but at night there was little difference with frequency, suggesting that acoustic surveys for identifying and estimating the abundance of shirasu should be done during daytime, when differences occur between frequencies and the shirasu form dense schools.

Keywords: diurnal change; Engraulis japonicus; post-larvae; “shirasu”; target strength

Journal Article.  2430 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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