Journal Article

Urinary neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), a marker of tubular damage, is increased in patients with chronic heart failure

Kevin Damman, Dirk J. van Veldhuisen, Gerjan Navis, Adriaan A. Voors and Hans L. Hillege

in European Journal of Heart Failure

Published on behalf of European Society of Cardiology

Volume 10, issue 10, pages 997-1000
Published in print October 2008 | ISSN: 1388-9842
Published online October 2008 | e-ISSN: 1879-0844 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejheart.2008.07.001
Urinary neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), a marker of tubular damage, is increased in patients with chronic heart failure

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Renal impairment, as measured by reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and increased urinary albumin excretion (UAE), is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and is associated with reduced survival. The prevalence of structural tubular damage in CHF is unknown. We investigated 90 CHF patients and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls, and determined estimated GFR, UAE, N terminal-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and urinary neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) as a marker for tubular damage. CHF patients had significantly lower averaged estimated GFR (64 ± 17 vs 90 ± 12 mL/min/1.73 m2, P<0.0001), but higher NT-proBNP and UAE levels (both P<0.0001). Median urinary NGAL levels were markedly increased in CHF patients compared to controls (175 (70–346) vs 37 (6–58) μg/gCr, P<0.0001). Both serum creatinine (r=0.26, P=0.006) and eGFR (r=−0.29, P=0.002) were significantly associated with urinary NGAL levels as were NT-proBNP and UAE but to a lesser extent. In conclusion, renal impairment in CHF patients is not only characterised by decreased eGFR and increased UAE, but also by the presence of tubular damage, as measured by increased urinary NGAL concentrations.

Keywords: Chronic heart failure; Renal function; Albuminuria; Tubular damage; NGAL; Neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin

Journal Article.  1653 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Cardiovascular Medicine

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