Journal Article

Temperature-dependent fractionation of stable oxygen isotopes in otoliths of juvenile cod (<i>Gadus morhua</i> L.)

Hans Høie, Erling Otterlei and Arild Folkvord

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 61, issue 2, pages 243-251
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icesjms.2003.11.006
Temperature-dependent fractionation of stable oxygen isotopes in otoliths of juvenile cod (Gadus morhua L.)

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Analysis of stable oxygen isotopes in otoliths is a promising technique for estimating the ambient temperature experienced by fish, but consistent equations relating temperature and fractionation of stable oxygen isotopes in otoliths among different fish species are lacking. Juvenile cod were reared at constant temperatures from 6 to 20°C and the sagittal otoliths were analysed for oxygen isotope values. We determined that temperature-dependent fractionation of oxygen isotopes in the otoliths was close to that reported for inorganic aragonite at low temperatures, but there were deviations from oxygen isotope fractionation equations for otoliths of other species. The linear relationship between oxygen isotope value in the cod otoliths and temperature was determined to be: 1000 Ln α = 16.75(103 TK−1) − 27.09. Temperature estimates with 1°C precision at the 95% probability level require a sample size of ≥5 otoliths. Only an insignificant amount of the variance in the data was due to variance between left and right otolith, and due to repeated measurements of otolith subsamples. This study confirms that stable isotope values of cod otoliths can give precise and accurate estimates of the ambient temperature experienced by fish.

Keywords: cod; otolith; oxygen isotopes; precision; temperature

Journal Article.  5425 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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