Journal Article

An assessment of the upstream migration and reproductive behaviour of allis shad (<i>Alosa alosa</i> L.) using acoustic tracking

M.L. Acolas, M.L. Bégout Anras, V. Véron, H. Jourdan, M.R. Sabatié and J.L. Baglinière

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 61, issue 8, pages 1291-1304
Published in print January 2004 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2004 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icesjms.2004.07.023
An assessment of the upstream migration and reproductive behaviour of allis shad (Alosa alosa L.) using acoustic tracking

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We provide a detailed description of the migratory and reproductive behaviour of allis shad (Alosa alosa L.), a species that is in decline in Europe. Adult swimming behaviour during the last part of upstream migration and on a spawning ground downstream of an insurmountable dam was studied in detail and its main features identified, “characterized” in this context. Mobile telemetry and a fixed telemetry system were used to record fish positions and to monitor 23 acoustically tagged individuals (17 females and six males) during the 2001 and 2002 reproductive seasons. Allis shad showed considerable exploratory behaviour, and a rest area was observed 1.5 km downstream of the spawning ground. Thirteen individuals were observed on the spawning area, though both males and females spent most of their time (70–99%) away from it. Male and female residency times on the spawning area were, respectively, 1–11 days and 1–7 days, and females were observed during both day and night on the spawning ground. In 2002, an analysis of the 3D swimming behaviour on the spawning ground of six individuals allowed us to estimate the number of spawning events per fish. Males participated in more spawning acts (up to 60) than females (0–2).

Keywords: Alosa alosa; anadromous migration; behavioural ecology; reproduction; telemetry

Journal Article.  8475 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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