Journal Article

Population genetic structure and history of the long-tailed hake, <i>Macruronus magellanicus</i>, in the SW Atlantic as revealed by mtDNA RFLP analysis

M.E. D'Amato and G.R. Carvalho

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 62, issue 2, pages 247-255
Published in print January 2005 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2005 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icesjms.2004.11.002
Population genetic structure and history of the long-tailed hake, Macruronus magellanicus, in the SW Atlantic as revealed by mtDNA RFLP analysis

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The long-tailed hake, Macruronus magellanicus, is widely distributed in the SW Atlantic, and although it is commercially exploited, the extent of genetic structuring remains unclear. The hypothesis of a separate inshore stock as suggested by past biological data in northern Patagonia was tested with RFLP profiles of the mtDNA region ND5/6, in a total of 160 animals from eight locations. Sequence divergence between populations was nil, and all diversity is contained within populations. Despite the lack of geographic structuring in the distribution of haplotypes, the inference of population homogeneity should be taken cautiously owing to the skewed frequency distribution of haplotypes, with one allele accounting for 63% of individuals. A phylogenetic analysis of haplotypes reveals a star-shaped pattern with the presence of two lineages that may represent a population expansion. A rapid turnover of lineages, sweepstake recruitment, rapid expansion, or vulnerability to environmental conditions is not only suggested by the network pattern, but also by the departure from neutrality expectations. However, the role of selection cannot be ruled out until more loci or markers are examined.

Keywords: Macruronus magellanicus; mtDNA; population history; population structure

Journal Article.  5136 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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