Journal Article

The effects of marine sand and gravel extraction on the macrobenthos at a commercial dredging site (results 6 years post-dredging)

S.E. Boyd, D.S. Limpenny, H.L. Rees and K.M. Cooper

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 62, issue 2, pages 145-162
Published in print January 2005 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2005 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icesjms.2004.11.014
The effects of marine sand and gravel extraction on the macrobenthos at a commercial dredging site (results 6 years post-dredging)

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Environmental Science
  • Marine and Estuarine Biology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Benthic recolonization was investigated at a site historically used for the extraction of marine sand and gravel. The main objective was to assess the effects of different levels of dredging intensity on the recolonization of benthic fauna and sediments. Preliminary observations from this study indicated that the fauna within an area of seabed exposed to high dredging intensities remained in a perturbed state some 4 years after the cessation of dredging. Thereafter, annual monitoring surveys of the benthos and sediments at the “treatment” and “reference” sites have followed the recolonization process. Results from univariate and multivariate data analyses show that distinct differences in the nature of assemblages at sites exposed to high and lower levels of dredging intensity persist at least 6 years after the cessation of dredging. This paper presents the physical and biological findings 6 years after dredging, together with a generic framework for evaluating post-cessation recolonization studies.

Keywords: aggregate extraction; dredging; impacts; North Sea; recolonization

Journal Article.  9212 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.