Journal Article

The target strength of Antarctic krill (<i>Euphausia superba</i>) measured by the split-beam method in a small tank at 70 kHz

Kazuo Amakasu and Masahiko Furusawa

in ICES Journal of Marine Science

Published on behalf of ICES/CIEM

Volume 63, issue 1, pages 36-45
Published in print January 2006 | ISSN: 1054-3139
Published online January 2006 | e-ISSN: 1095-9289 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.icesjms.2005.07.012
The target strength of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) measured by the split-beam method in a small tank at 70 kHz

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The target strengths (TS) of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) were measured at 70 kHz aboard the research and training vessel “Umitaka-maru” of Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology in February 2003 during a Southern Ocean survey. The systematic variations of TS vs. the incident angle of the ensonified wave, henceforth called TS-patterns, were successfully measured for 12 live Antarctic krill. These measurements were compared with the theoretical TS-patterns predicted by the Distorted-Wave Born Approximation-based deformed-cylinder model (DWBA model). While there was good agreement near the main lobe, the measurements were higher than the model predictions in the side-lobe regions; this is consistent with the observations of others. Several possible causes of this discrepancy such as the bending of abdomen and scattering from pleopods were examined, but no single factor was identified as the cause. Rather, it is likely that the discrepancy is a result of a combination of several factors.

Keywords: Antarctic krill; small tank; split-beam method; target strength

Journal Article.  4021 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Environmental Science ; Marine and Estuarine Biology

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