Journal Article

Dynamic rupture and stress change in a normal faulting earthquake in the subducting Cocos plate

Takeshi Mikumo, Miguel A. Santoyo and Shri Krishna Singh

in Geophysical Journal International

Volume 140, issue 3, pages 611-620
Published in print March 2000 | ISSN: 0956-540X
Published online March 2000 | e-ISSN: 1365-246X | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-246X.2000.00055.x
Dynamic rupture and stress change in a normal faulting earthquake in the subducting Cocos plate

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A large nearly vertical, normal faulting earthquake (Mw = 7.1) took place in 1997 in the Cocos plate, just beneath the ruptured fault zone of the great 1985 Michoacan thrust event (Mw = 8.1). Dynamic rupture and resultant stress change during the 1997 earthquake have been investigated on the basis of near-source strong-motion records together with a 3-D dynamic 9model.

Dynamically consistent waveform inversion reveals a highly heterogeneous distribution of stress drop, including patch-like asperities and negative stress-drop zones. Zones of high stress drop are mainly confined to the deeper, southeastern section of the vertical fault, where the maximum dynamic stress drop reaches 280 bars (28 MPa). The dynamically generated source time function varies with location on the fault, and yields a short slip duration, which is caused by a short scalelength of stress-drop heterogeneities. The synthetic seismograms calculated from the dynamic model are generally consistent with the strong-motion velocity records in the frequency range lower than 0.5 Hz.

The pattern of stress-drop distribution appears, in some sense, to be consistent with that of coseismic changes in shear stress resulting from the 1985 thrust event. This consistency suggests that the stress transfer from the 1985 event to the subducting plate could be one of the possible mechanisms that increased the chance of the occurrence of the 1997 earthquake.

Keywords: dynamics; inversion; normal faulting; rupture propagation; shear stress; synthetic waveforms

Journal Article.  4922 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Geophysics

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