Journal Article

Tuberculosis in the Inner City: Impact of a Continuing Epidemic in the 1990s

Mark J. Sotir, Patricia Parrott, Beverly Metchock, Naomi N. Bock, John E. McGowan, Susan M. Ray, Lincoln P. Miller and Henry M. Blumberg

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 29, issue 5, pages 1138-1144
Published in print November 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313453
Tuberculosis in the Inner City: Impact of a Continuing Epidemic in the 1990s

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Tuberculosis cases have recently declined in the United States, renewing interest in disease elimination. We examined the epidemiology of tuberculosis from 1991 through 1997 at an inner-city public hospital and assessed population-based tuberculosis rates by ZIP code in the 8 metropolitan Atlanta counties. During the 7 years, 1378 new patients had tuberculosis diagnosed at our hospital (mean, 197 patients/year), accounting for 25% of tuberculosis cases in Georgia. Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was common, but a significant decrease in the proportion of HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis was noted over time. Most patients were members of a minority group (93%) and were born in the United States (96%). Two inner-city ZIP code areas had annual tuberculosis rates >120 cases per 100,000 persons, and 8 ZIP code areas had annual rates of 47–88 cases per 100,000 persons between 1993 and 1997, compared with the annual national average of 8.7 cases per 100,000 persons. Our hospital continues to care for large numbers of tuberculosis patients, and rates of tuberculosis remain high in the inner city. These data mandate a concentration of efforts and resources in urban locations if tuberculosis control and elimination is to be achieved in the United States.

Journal Article.  4564 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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