Journal Article

O'Nyong-Nyong Fever in South-Central Uganda, 1996—1997: Clinical Features and Validation of a Clinical Case Definition for Surveillance Purposes

Noah Kiwanuka, Eduard J. Sanders, Elly B. Rwaguma, Jun Kawamata, Freddie P. Ssengooba, Robinah Najjemba, Willy A. Were, Margaret Lamunu, George Bagambisa, Thomas R. Burkot, Lee Dunster, J. Julius Lutwama, Denise A. Martin, C. Bruce Cropp, Nick Karabatsos, Robert S. Lanciotti, Theodore F. Tsai and Grant L. Campbell

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 29, issue 5, pages 1243-1250
Published in print November 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313462
O'Nyong-Nyong Fever in South-Central Uganda, 1996—1997: Clinical Features and Validation of a Clinical Case Definition for Surveillance Purposes

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O'nyong-nyong (ONN) fever, caused by infection with a mosquito-borne central African alphavirus, is an acute, nonfatal illness characterized by polyarthralgia. During 1996–1997, south-central Uganda experienced the second ONN fever epidemic ever recognized. Among 391 persons interviewed and sampled, 40 cases of confirmed and 21 of presumptive, well-characterized acute, recent, or previous ONN fever were identified through active case-finding efforts or during a household serosurvey and by the application of clinical and laboratory criteria. Among confirmed cases, the knees and ankles were the joints most commonly affected. The median duration of arthralgia was 6 days (range, 2–21 days) and of immobilization was 4 days (range, 1–14 days). In the majority, generalized skin rash was reported, and nearly half had lymphadenopathy, mainly of the cervical region. Viremia was documented in 16 cases, primarily during the first 3 days of illness, and in some of these, body temperature was normal. During this epidemic, the combination of fever, arthralgia, and lymphadenopathy had a specificity of 83% and a sensitivity of 61% in the identification of cases of ONN fever and thus could be useful for surveillance purposes.

Journal Article.  6218 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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