Journal Article

Clinical and Prognostic Categorization of Extraintestinal Nontyphoidal <i>Salmonella</i> Infections in Infants and Children

Sayomporn Sirinavin, Panida Jayanetra and Ammarin Thakkinstian

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 29, issue 5, pages 1151-1156
Published in print November 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313469
Clinical and Prognostic Categorization of Extraintestinal Nontyphoidal Salmonella Infections in Infants and Children

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The study included 172 patients, aged 0–15 years, for whom at least 1 nonfecal, nonurinary specimen was culture-positive for nontyphoidal Salmonella. Ninety-five percent had positive blood cultures. Immunocompromising diseases were found in 19% of 74 infants and 77% of 98 children. Associations between the study factors and outcomes, as localized infection or death, were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Thirty-three patients had localized infections. An adjusted risk factor for development of localized infections was an age of <12 months (P = .003). There were 17 deaths. The case-fatality rates were 43% and 10% for immunocompromised and 5% and 0% for nonimmunocompromised infants and children, respectively. Adjusted risk factors for death were age of <12 months (P = .006), inappropriate antimicrobial therapy (P = .014), meningitis or culture-proven pneumonia due to nontyphoidal Salmonella (P = .004), and immunocompromised status (P < .001). The clinical courses and prognoses for infants and children with extraintestinal infection due to nontyphoidal Salmonella can be categorized into 4 groups according to the characteristics of age (infants vs. children) and host status (immunocompromised vs. nonimmunocompromised).

Journal Article.  3544 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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