Journal Article

Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy for Central Nervous System Infections

Alan D. Tice, Kevin Strait, Rob Ramey and Pamela A. Hoaglund

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 29, issue 6, pages 1394-1399
Published in print December 1999 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 1999 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313503
Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy for Central Nervous System Infections

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Patients with central nervous system (CNS) infections are increasingly treated with intravenous antimicrobials outside the hospital, but the safety and problems associated with this therapy have not been well defined. To examine this issue, we reviewed 68 cases in which outpatient intravenous antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) was received through our physician office-based infusion clinic. All infections were cured, and no deaths occurred during therapy. Seizures occurred in 2 patients but without significant injury and apparently were unrelated to antimicrobial therapy. Eleven patients (16%) were hospitalized after starting OPAT, 5 for procedures and 6 for medical reasons. The antimicrobial used was changed in 13 cases (19%) because of an adverse effect or clinical failure. OPAT can be safe and effective for patients with CNS infections, but patients must be carefully selected and monitored closely.

Journal Article.  4269 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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