Journal Article

Early Results (at 6 Months) with Intermittent Clarithromycin-Including Regimens for Lung Disease Due to <i>Mycobacterium avium</i> Complex

David E. Griffith, Barbara A. Brown, Peter Cegielski, David T. Murphy and Richard J. Wallace

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 2, pages 288-292
Published in print February 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313644
Early Results (at 6 Months) with Intermittent Clarithromycin-Including Regimens for Lung Disease Due to Mycobacterium avium Complex

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We initiated a prospective noncomparative trial of treatment for lung disease due to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in human immunodeficiency virus-negative patients, with a regimen of clarithromycin (1000 mg), rifabutin (300–600 mg), and ethambutol (25 mg/kg) administered 3 times per week. Fifty-nine patients were enrolled. Twelve (20%) were lost to follow-up, and 6 (10%) developed clarithromycin intolerance. The remaining 41 patients (69%) completed the initial 6 months of therapy. The sputum of 32 of these patients (78%) converted to negative. When results were compared with the sputum response rates at 6 months in previous studies with a regimen including daily clarithromycin and regimens including intermittent (3 times per week) azithromycin with the same companion drugs, no differences in treatment responses were evident. Adverse reactions related to rifabutin were a major problem, and for 24 (41%) of 59 patients the dosage was decreased or the drug was withdrawn. Intermittent (3 times per week) administration of clarithromycin appears to be as effective as daily administration in effecting sputum conversion in pulmonary MAC disease.

Journal Article.  3737 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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