Journal Article

Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor as Immunomodulating Factor Together with Influenza Vaccination in Stem Cell Transplant Patients

Karlis Pauksen, Annika Linde, Viera Hammarström, Jan Sjölin, Jan Carneskog, Gunilla Jonsson, Gunnar öberga, Hans Engelmann and Per Ljungman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 2, pages 342-348
Published in print February 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313663
Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor as Immunomodulating Factor Together with Influenza Vaccination in Stem Cell Transplant Patients

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The effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the serological response at influenza vaccination was studied in 117 patients who had undergone stem cell transplantation (SCT). The vaccine response was evaluated as significant increases in levels of influenza hemagglutination-inhibition (HAI) antibodies and of IgG antibodies measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There was no difference in antibody response to either influenza A or B in 64 patients who received GM-CSF at vaccination, compared with the 53 who did not. In the subgroup of allogeneic SCT patients, HAI showed that the response rate to the influenza B vaccine was significantly higher in the treatment group (P < .05). ELISA showed that autologous SCT patients with breast cancer who received GM-CSF had a better response to influenza A (P < .05) and B (P < .01). At early vaccination, 4–12 months after stem cell transplantation, these responses were more pronounced. GM-CSF appears to improve the response to influenza vaccination in some groups of SCT patients, but only to a limited extent.

Journal Article.  4684 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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