Journal Article

National Survey of Extended-Interval Aminoglycoside Dosing

Susan K. Chuck, Susan R. Raber, Keith A. Rodvold and Danyel Areff

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 3, pages 433-439
Published in print March 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313692
National Survey of Extended-Interval Aminoglycoside Dosing

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A random sample survey of 500 acute care hospitals in the United States was conducted to evaluate the adoption of extended-interval aminoglycoside dosing (EIAD). The survey revealed that EIAD has been adopted in 3 of every 4 acute care hospitals, a 4-fold increase since 1993. Of the 74.7% of hospitals reporting EIAD, 64% had written guidelines. Equal or less toxicity (87.1%), equal efficacy (76.9%), and cost-savings (65.6%) were common rationales. There has been a trend toward higher adult dosages of gentamicin (e.g., >5 mg/kg/dose) and an increase in the adoption of EIAD across all age groups (neonatal, 11%, and pediatric, 23%). Monitoring of aminoglycoside concentrations has shifted to a single determination of concentration, at 6–18 h after drug administration. The most common methods of dosage adjustment for declining renal function were an interval extension with the same dose (47%) or use of the Hartford nomogram (32%).

Journal Article.  4631 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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