Journal Article

Trends of Gonorrhea and Chlamydial Infection during 1985–1996 among Active-Duty Soldiers at a United States Army Installation

Arlene C. Seña, William C. Miller, Irving F. Hoffman, Hrishikesh Chakraborty, Myron S. Cohen, Pamela Jenkins and Kelly T. McKee

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 4, pages 742-748
Published in print April 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313742
Trends of Gonorrhea and Chlamydial Infection during 1985–1996 among Active-Duty Soldiers at a United States Army Installation

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High rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been reported in military populations. However, it remains uncertain whether the incidence of STDs is higher among military personnel than in the civilian population. The annual incidence of gonorrhea and chlamydia from 1985 through 1996 at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, was determined by use of a clinic database and demographic information for the entire installation. A direct standardization for age, sex, and race/ethnicity was performed, and the adjusted annual rates among active duty soldiers were compared with rates among men and women in North Carolina and the United States. Results showed that the adjusted incidence of gonorrhea and chlamydia among Fort Bragg soldiers remained higher overall than comparable state and national rates during the period of analyses. The 1996 adjusted chlamydia rates for male and female active duty soldiers were 3-fold to 6-fold higher than rates for males and females in North Carolina and in the United States as a whole. STDs continue to lead to significant morbidity in this representative military population.

Journal Article.  5076 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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