Journal Article

Reducing Risk of Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in a Military STD Clinic: Evaluation of a Randomized Preventive Intervention Trial

Pamela R. Jenkins, Richard A. Jenkins, Ellen D. Nannis, Kelly T. McKee and Lydia R. Temoshok

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 4, pages 730-735
Published in print April 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313743
Reducing Risk of Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in a Military STD Clinic: Evaluation of a Randomized Preventive Intervention Trial

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Three single-session preventive interventions for reducing sexually transmitted disease (STD) and human immunodeficiency virus infection risk behaviors were evaluated with a sample of 400 men who attended a large military STD clinic. A quasi-experimental, pre-evaluation/postevaluation design was used, comparing standard clinic care alone versus standard care combined with 1 of 3 experimental interventions: health-risk appraisal, interactive video, and targeted situational behaviors. Questionnaire data were collected at baseline and during follow-up visits at 2 weeks and 2 months. Findings indicated that the health-risk appraisal and interactive video increased adherence with clinic recommendations to abstain from sex (χ2[3199] = 19.67; P < .001) and increased readiness to change “risky” partner– selection behavior (χ2[2194] = 6.42; P < .04). Follow-up data suggested that STD-related risk behavior was particularly resistant to change but that the single-session intervention had some impact, which could be viewed as a “priming” effect that enhances multisession interventions.

Journal Article.  4629 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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