Journal Article

Features of Urethritis in a Cohort of Male Soldiers

Kelly T. McKee, Pamela R. Jenkins, Robin Garner, Richard A. Jenkins, Ellen D. Nannis, Irving F. Hoffman, John L. Schmitz and Myron S. Cohen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 4, pages 736-741
Published in print April 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313745
Features of Urethritis in a Cohort of Male Soldiers

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Of 400 cases of urethritis in male soldiers enrolled in a behavioral intervention project, the etiology of 69% was defined at study enrollment, as well as the etiology of 72% of 25 repeated episodes involving 21 men during the first 78 days of active follow-up (5% of the cohort). Chlamydia trachomatis (36%), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (34%), and Ureaplasma urealyticum (19%) were the most common causes of infection identified at enrollment and during subsequent visits (44%, 28%, and 12%, respectively). By univariate analysis, patients with repeated infection (“repeaters”) were significantly more likely to report a history of sexually transmitted disease (STD; relative risk [RR], 3) and sex with sex workers (RR, 4) than were nonrepeaters. By multivariate analysis, only STD history was significant (RR, 2.8). Characteristics of repeaters in this cohort suggest that specific patterns may be used to establish screening “profiles” of potential repeaters, by which such individuals might be targeted for aggressive intervention at the time of the initial diagnosis.

Journal Article.  4532 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.