Journal Article

Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Patients with AIDS Are Associated with a Low Infection Rate

Daniel J. Skiest, Monica Abbott and Philip Keiser

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue 6, pages 949-952
Published in print June 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313822
Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Patients with AIDS Are Associated with a Low Infection Rate

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We reviewed the medical records of all human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients who had a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) placed during a 1-year period. Ninety-seven PICCs were inserted in 66 patients for 8337 catheter-days. Eighty of 97 catheters were used primarily to treat cytomegalovirus disease. The mean time to any complication was 150 days. The total complication rate was 6.1 per 1000 catheter-days. The total infection rate was 1.3 per 1000 catheter-days, and the serious infection rate was 0.8 per 1000 catheter-days. The mean time to a serious infection was 310 days. The noninfectious complication rate was 4.6 per 1000 catheter-days. PICCs were associated with a low infection rate and a moderate mechanical complication rate, which compare favorably with historical rates seen in AIDS patients with other types of central venous access devices. PICCs are a reasonable alternative to other central venous access devices in patients with HIV or AIDS.

Journal Article.  2104 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.