Journal Article

Using Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Antiretroviral Drug-Drug Interactions in the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

John G. Gerber

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue Supplement_2, pages S123-S129
Published in print June 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313857
Using Pharmacokinetics to Optimize Antiretroviral Drug-Drug Interactions in the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

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Better understanding of the pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drugs has resulted in the design of combination therapies for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This has improved the bioavailability and prolonged the plasma half-life of some of the drugs, resulting in enhanced antiviral activity. However, antiviral combination therapy can also result in adverse drug-drug interactions and diminished antiretroviral activity. In this review, we examine drug interactions involving combinations of protease inhibitors, combinations of protease inhibitors with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and combinations of nucleoside analogues for the treatment of patients with HIV infection. We discuss examples and mechanisms of pharmacokinetic interactions that improve or decrease antiviral efficacy.

Journal Article.  5141 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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