Journal Article

Multiple Epitopes from the <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i> ESAT-6 Antigen Are Recognized by Antigen-Specific Human T Cell Lines

A. S. Mustafa, F. Oftung, H. A. Amoudy, N. M. Madi, A. T. Abal, F. Shaban, I. Rosen Krands and P. Andersen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue Supplement_3, pages S201-S205
Published in print June 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313862
Multiple Epitopes from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 Antigen Are Recognized by Antigen-Specific Human T Cell Lines

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A synthetic-peptide approach was used to map epitope regions of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 6-kDa early secreted antigen target (ESAT-6) by testing human CD4+ T cell lines for secretion of IFN-γ in response to recombinant ESAT-6 (rESAT-6) and overlapping 20-mer peptides covering the antigen sequence. The results demonstrate that all of the ESAT-6 peptides screened were able to induce IFN-γ secretion from one or more of the T cell lines tested. Some of the individual T cell lines showed the capacity to respond to all peptides. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) typing of the donors showed that rESAT-6 was presented to T cells in association with multiple HLA-DR molecules. The results suggest that frequent recognition of the M. tuberculosis ESAT-6 antigen by T cells from patients with tuberculosis is due to the presence of multiple epitopes scattered throughout the ESAT-6 sequence.

Journal Article.  2804 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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