Journal Article

Correlates of Protective Immunity to <i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i> in Humans

Jerrold J. Ellner, Christina S. Hirsch and Christopher C. Whalen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 30, issue Supplement_3, pages S279-S282
Published in print June 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313874
Correlates of Protective Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Humans

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Correlates of protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans are desirable for identifying protective antigens, demonstrating the immunogenicity of a vaccine candidate and its potential efficacy, and permitting optimization of the dose, vehicle, adjuvant, and schedule of immunization. Potential correlates can be proposed on the basis of animal models and ex vivo/in vitro studies in humans. Most critical is their validation; ultimate validation will require correlation with protection in a phase III efficacy trial of an effective vaccine. Other approaches, however, can allow selection of the most promising correlates for inclusion in phase I and II and, ultimately, phase III vaccine trials. Current data from experimental models and studies of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and their household contacts indicate that Mycobacterium tuberculosis—stimulated whole-blood production of interferon-γ, although imperfect, is the best available correlate. Nonetheless, further refinement of this assay and additional studies of more complex assays that model M. tuberculosis killing and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity are warranted. During planning of a vaccine trial, the best available correlates of immunity can be selected for inclusion.

Journal Article.  1973 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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