Journal Article

Incidence and Prevalence of Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis among Children in Atlanta and Seattle

L. R. Armstrong, E. J. D. Preston, M. Reichert, D. L. Phillips, R. Nisenbaum, N. W. Todd, I. N. Jacobs, A. F. Inglis, S. C. Manning and W. C. Reeves

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 1, pages 107-109
Published in print July 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313914
Incidence and Prevalence of Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis among Children in Atlanta and Seattle

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

The incidence and prevalence of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) for children aged <18 years were estimated in 2 US cities, Atlanta and Seattle, in 1996. All otolaryngologists in a 24-county area in metropolitan Atlanta (101 physicians) and an 8-county area in metropolitan Seattle (139 physicians) agreed to participate in the study. Medical record chart abstraction was performed only for children with documented current residence in the study area (21 patients in Atlanta and 14 patients in Seattle). The incidence rate for juvenile RRP was 1.11/100,000 population in Atlanta and 0.36/100,000 in Seattle. The prevalence rate was 2.59/100,000 population in Atlanta and 1.69/100,000 in Seattle. In neither city did prevalences differ significantly when stratified by sex or race. Extrapolation of these estimates to the US population suggests that 80–1500 incident cases and 700–3000 prevalent cases of juvenile RRP will occur in the United States during 1999.

Journal Article.  1920 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.