Journal Article

Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Travelers: A Prospective Study, with Assessment of Therapy with Ivermectin

Olivier Bouchaud, Sandrine Houzé, Ricarda Schiemann, Rémy Durand, Pascal Ralaimazava, Catherine Ruggeri and Jean-Pierre Coulaud

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 2, pages 493-498
Published in print August 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313942
Cutaneous Larva Migrans in Travelers: A Prospective Study, with Assessment of Therapy with Ivermectin

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The purpose of this prospective study was to update epidemiological data on cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) and to assess the therapeutic efficacy of ivermectin. We performed the study between June 1994 and December 1998 at our travel clinic. Ivermectin (a single dose of 200 g/kg) was offered to all the patients with CLM, and its efficacy and tolerability were assessed by a questionnaire. Sixty-four patients were enrolled. All were European and had stayed in tropical areas. After the patients had returned from their destinations, 55% had lesions occur within a mean of 16 days (range, 1–120 days; >1 month in 7 patients). The initial diagnosis was wrong in 55% of patients. The mean number of lesions was 3 (range, 1–15), and the main sites were the feet (48%) and buttocks (23%). The cure rate after a single dose of ivermectin was 77%. In 14 patients, 1 or 2 supplementary doses were necessary, and the overall cure rate was 97%. The median time required for pruritus and lesions to disappear was 3 and 7 days, respectively. No systemic adverse effects were reported. Physicians' knowledge of CLM, which can have a long incubation period, is poor. Single-dose ivermectin therapy appears to be effective and well tolerated, even if several treatments are sometimes necessary.

Journal Article.  3200 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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