Journal Article

Cholera Vaccines

Edward T. Ryan and Stephen B. Calderwood

Edited by Charles D. Ericsson and Robert Steffen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 2, pages 561-565
Published in print August 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313951
Cholera Vaccines

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Cholera causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. For travelers, the risk of developing cholera per month of stay in a developing country is ∼0.001%–0.01%, and cholera may present as traveler's diarrhea. In the United States, only a poorly tolerated, marginally effective, parenterally administered, phenol-inactivated vaccine is available. Outside the United States, 2 additional vaccines are commercially available: an oral killed whole cell—cholera toxin recombinant B subunit vaccine (WC-rBS) and an oral live attenuated Vibrio cholerae vaccine (CVD 103-HgR). These oral vaccines are well tolerated. In field trials, WC-rBS provides 80%–85% protection from cholera caused by V. cholerae serogroup O1 for at least 6 months. In volunteer studies, CVD 103-HgR provides 62%–100% protection against cholera caused by V. cholerae for at least 6 months. No commercially available cholera vaccine protects against disease caused by V. cholerae serogroup O139. New cholera vaccines are being developed.

Journal Article.  3943 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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