Journal Article

Impact of Antimicrobial Therapy on Nasopharyngeal Carriage of <i>Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae</i>, and <i>Branhamella catarrhalis</i> in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections

Emmanuelle Varon, Corinne Levy, France De La Rocque, Michel Boucherat, Dominique Deforche, Isabelle Podglajen, Michel Navel and Robert Cohen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 2, pages 477-481
Published in print August 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/313981
Impact of Antimicrobial Therapy on Nasopharyngeal Carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Branhamella catarrhalis in Children with Respiratory Tract Infections

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We conducted a multicenter prospective study to document changes in nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Branhamella catarrhalis during antibiotic therapy. A cohort of 629 children with respiratory tract infections underwent nasopharyngeal sampling before and after antibiotic treatment. Susceptibility testing, serotyping, arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis were used to compare pretreatment and posttreatment strains of S. pneumoniae. A significant decrease in carriage of all 3 species (especially S. pneumoniae and B. catarrhalis) was recorded. The increase in the proportion of penicillin-resistant pneumococci (PRP; 66% vs. 44%) was due to the decreased carriage of penicillin-susceptible pneumococci (71 of 629 vs. 176 of 629). The risk of PRP carriage in a given child did not increase. None of the children was found to harbor genetically related strains with increased minimum inhibitory concentrations. Given the multiple resistance of PRP, β-lactam antibiotic therapy also increased the incidence of macrolide-resistant strains, whereas macrolides selected both macrolide- and penicillin-resistant strains.

Journal Article.  3055 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.