Journal Article

Bacterial Monopolists: The Bundling and Dissemination of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Gram-Positive Bacteria

Louis B. Rice and George M. Eliopoulos

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 3, pages 762-769
Published in print September 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/314005
Bacterial Monopolists: The Bundling and Dissemination of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Gram-Positive Bacteria

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Antibiotic resistance is the unavoidable result of our placing selective pressure on the microbial community. Advances in molecular biology techniques in the past 2 decades have allowed us to greatly improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which resistance emerges and disseminates among human pathogenic bacteria. Gram-positive bacteria employ a diverse array of elements, including plasmids, transposons, insertion sequences, and bacteriophages, to disseminate resistance. An understanding of these mechanisms and their prevalence can improve our ability to treat clinical infections in hospitalized patients, as well as to predict and control the spread of resistant bacteria in the nosocomial environment.

Journal Article.  4933 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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