Journal Article

High Rate of Candidemia in Patients Sustaining Injuries in a Bomb Blast at a Marketplace: A Possible Environmental Source

Dana G. Wolf, Itzhack Polacheck, Colin Block, Charles L. Sprung, Michael Muggia-Sullam, Yehuda G. Wolf, Arieh Oppenheim-Eden, Avraham Rivkind and Mervyn Shapiro

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 3, pages 712-716
Published in print September 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/314024
High Rate of Candidemia in Patients Sustaining Injuries in a Bomb Blast at a Marketplace: A Possible Environmental Source

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In this study, a cluster of candidemia among patients sustaining injuries in a bomb blast at a marketplace was investigated by means of a multivariate analysis, a case-control study, and quantitative air sampling. Candidemia occurred in 7 (30%) of 21 patients (58% of those admitted to the intensive care unit [ICU]) between 4 and 16 days (mean, 12 days) after the injury and was the single most frequent cause of bloodstream infections. Inhalation injury was the strongest predictor for candidemia by multivariate analysis. Candidemia among the case patients occurred at a significantly higher rate than among comparable trauma patients injured in different urban settings, including a pedestrian mall (2 of 29; P = .02), and among contemporary ICU control patients (1 of 40; P = .001). Air sampling revealed exclusive detection of Candida species and increased mold concentration in the market in comparison with the mall environment. These findings suggest a role for an exogenous, environmental source in the development of candidemia in some trauma patients.

Journal Article.  2772 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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