Journal Article

The Role of Physical Proximity in Nosocomial Diarrhea

Victor T. Chang and Kenrad Nelson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 3, pages 717-722
Published in print September 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/314030
The Role of Physical Proximity in Nosocomial Diarrhea

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

To examine physical proximity as a risk factor for the nosocomial acquisition of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) and of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD), we assessed a retrospective cohort of 2859 patients admitted to a community hospital from 1 March 1987 through 31 August 1987. Of these patients, 68 had nosocomial CDAD and 54 had nosocomial AAD. In multivariate analysis, physical proximity to a patient with CDAD (relative risk [RR], 1.86; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06–3.28), exposure to clindamycin (RR, 4.22; 95% CI, 2.11–8.45), and the number of antibiotics taken (RR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23–1.81) were significant. For patients with nosocomial AAD, exposure to a roommate with AAD (RR, 3.94; 95% CI, 1.27–12.24), a stay in an intensive care unit or cardiac care unit (RR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.05–3.53), and the number of antibiotics taken (RR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.67–2.40) were significant risk factors. Physical proximity may be an independent risk factor for acquisition of nosocomial CDAD and AAD.

Journal Article.  3814 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.