Journal Article

Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections Caused by <i>Acinetobacter</i> Species in United States Hospitals: Clinical Features, Molecular Epidemiology, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

Hilmar Wisplinghoff, Michael B. Edmond, Michael A. Pfaller, Ronald N. Jones, Richard P. Wenzel and Harald Seifert

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 3, pages 690-697
Published in print September 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/314040
Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections Caused by Acinetobacter Species in United States Hospitals: Clinical Features, Molecular Epidemiology, and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We examined the clinical and epidemiological features of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Acinetobacter species and observed from 1 March 1995 through 28 February 1998 at 49 United States hospitals (SCOPE National Surveillance Program). Acinetobacter species were found in 24 hospitals (49%) and accounted for 1.5% of all nosocomial BSIs reported. One hundred twenty-nine isolates were identified either as A. baumannii (n = 111) or other Acinetobacter species (n = 18). Patients with A. baumannii BSI, compared with patients with nosocomial BSI caused by other gram-negative pathogens, were more frequently observed in the intensive care unit (69% vs. 47%, respectively; P < .001; odds ratio [OR] 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–3.7) and were more frequently receiving mechanical ventilation (58% vs. 30%, respectively; P < .001; OR 3.2; 95% CI 2.1–4.8). Crude mortality in patients with A. baumannii BSI was 32%. Molecular relatedness of strains was studied by use of polymerase chain reaction-based fingerprinting. Clonal spread of a single strain occurred in 5 hospitals. Interhospital spread of epidemic A. baumannii strains was not observed. The most active antimicrobial agents against A. baumannii (90% minimum inhibitory concentration values) were imipenem (1 mg/L; 100% of isolates susceptible), amikacin (8 mg/L; 96%), tobramycin (4 mg/L; 92%), and doxycycline (4 mg/L; 91%). Thirty percent of isolates were resistant to ≥4 classes of antimicrobials and were considered to be multidrug resistant.

Journal Article.  5222 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.