Journal Article

In Vitro Activity of Newer Fluoroquinolones for Respiratory Tract Infections and Emerging Patterns of Antimicrobial Resistance: Data from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program

Ronald N. Jones and Michael A. Pfaller

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue Supplement_2, pages S16-S23
Published in print August 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online August 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/314054
In Vitro Activity of Newer Fluoroquinolones for Respiratory Tract Infections and Emerging Patterns of Antimicrobial Resistance: Data from the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program

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In 1997, an international surveillance program, SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, was initiated with the aim of tracking the emergence of antimicrobial resistance worldwide. Results from reference antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacterial pathogens (from bloodstream, inpatient and outpatient lower respiratory tract, urinary tract, and skin and soft-tissue infections) were included in an extensive database used to define antimicrobial resistance patterns throughout the world. On the basis of 1997–1999 test results from the Americas, fluoroquinolones continue to demonstrate potent in vitro activity against Enterobacteriaceae and important pathogens (Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and atypicals) that cause community-acquired respiratory tract infections. At published breakpoint concentrations, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, grepafloxacin, trovafloxacin, and ciprofloxacin inhibited ∼100% of H. influenzae isolates, including those that demonstrated resistance to β-lactams and macrolides. Fluoroquinolones were also active against numerous other gram-negative bacilli and demonstrated high activity against S. pneumoniae and β-hemolytic or viridans group streptococci. New fluoroquinolones maintain activity against penicillin-resistant strains of S. pneumoniae, with a low overall resistance in this species, even among the most recent (1999) clinical isolates. The SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program will continue to monitor the antibacterial activity of these newer agents throughout the world, to identify emerging resistant strains and to facilitate possible intervention strategies as these newer compounds are used in the clinic setting.

Journal Article.  3962 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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