Journal Article

Value of Mandatory Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus in a Sub-Saharan Hospital Population

Darwin L. Palmer, Peter R. Mason, Christopher Pasi and Ocean Tobiwa

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 5, pages 1258-1265
Published in print November 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online November 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/317453
Value of Mandatory Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus in a Sub-Saharan Hospital Population

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are currently hyperendemic in sub-Saharan Africa. HIV and AIDS have a special impact on working-age populations, economic resources, certain illnesses, and health care facilities. Assessment of HIV serostatus of hospitalized patients is rarely performed, however, because of a reluctance to intrude on patient confidentiality, a perceived lack of benefit (no antiretroviral therapy is available), and societal denial. We evaluated the effect on health care of HIV testing of patients routinely admitted to medical wards in the 2 major city hospitals in Harare, Zimbabwe. Of 196 patients tested, 58% were HIV positive with strong associations with infectious diseases, and with youth and weight loss, but not with cardiac, pulmonary, endocrinologic, or renal diagnoses, and not with rural versus urban location, occupation, sex, mortality, or cost of hospitalization. The clinical estimate of patients' HIV serostatus was largely inaccurate. Mandatory HIV testing of all hospitalized patients would improve diagnosis of infectious diseases, clarify patient prognosis, allow for individual counseling with regard to HIV prevention, and focus national health efforts by providing alarming, realistic statistics.

Journal Article.  6463 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.