Journal Article

Relationship Between Interleukin-6 Plasma Concentration in Patients with Sepsis, Monocyte Phenotype, Monocyte Phagocytic Properties, and Cytokine Production

Andreas Spittler, Martina Razenberger, Hartmut Kupper, Martin Kaul, Werner Hackl, George Boltz-Nitulescu, Reinhold Függer and Erich Roth

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 6, pages 1338-1342
Published in print December 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/317499
Relationship Between Interleukin-6 Plasma Concentration in Patients with Sepsis, Monocyte Phenotype, Monocyte Phagocytic Properties, and Cytokine Production

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Monocyte phenotype, their phagocytic capacity as well as the cytokine production from 10 patients with sepsis with low interleukin-6 (IL-6) serum concentrations (<1000 pg/mL) and 8 patients with sepsis with high IL-6 (⩾1000 pg/mL) plasma concentrations were investigated within 24 hours of fulfilling the criteria for sepsis. Monocytes from patients with high IL-6 levels had higher levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR, HLA-ABC, CD64, and CD71, and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-8, as well as the capacity of monocytes to phagocytose, was significantly elevated. Of 8 patients with high levels of plasma IL-6, 4 patients died. In contrast, all 10 patients with low plasma IL-6 concentrations survived until day 28. Patients who died had constant high IL-6 concentrations during the first 3 days, whereas IL-6 levels in patients who survived decreased by 88%. Our data indicate that IL-6 levels are a better prognostic parameter in the early phase of sepsis than the monocyte HLA-DR expression.

Journal Article.  4174 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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