Journal Article

Transient Increase in Diarrheal Diseases after the Devastating Earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey: Results of an infectious disease surveillance study

Haluk Vahaboglu, Sibel Gundes, Aynur Karadenizli, Birsen Mutlu, Sila Cetin, Fethiye Kolayli, Figen Coskunkan and Volkan Dündar

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 6, pages 1386-1389
Published in print December 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online December 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/317500
Transient Increase in Diarrheal Diseases after the Devastating Earthquake in Kocaeli, Turkey: Results of an infectious disease surveillance study

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

Immediately after the devastating earthquake in Turkey in August 1999, an infectious disease surveillance system was established in Kocaeli Province (the biggest area affected). This surveillance study was mainly focused on diarrheal diseases. During a 33-day period, 1,468 stool cultures were processed. Diarrheal diseases increased step-by-step and later decreased to the initial level by the end of this period. Cases were scattered throughout the entire region, and the identified causes were various, indicating a multifocal increase. Of the identified causes, Shigella species were the most common. Nevertheless, Shigella isolates also belonged to distinct serotypes and clones. This study indicated a multifocal, multiclonal increase in diarrheal diseases after this massive disaster, thus indicating the necessity to set up infectious disease surveillance systems after such events.

Journal Article.  2230 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.