Journal Article

Home Sampling versus Conventional Swab Sampling for Screening of <i>Chlamydia trachomatis</i> in Women: A Cluster-Randomized 1-Year Follow-up Study

Lars Østergaard, Berit Andersen, Jens K. Møller and Frede Olesen

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 4, pages 951-957
Published in print October 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/318139
Home Sampling versus Conventional Swab Sampling for Screening of Chlamydia trachomatis in Women: A Cluster-Randomized 1-Year Follow-up Study

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We compared the efficacy of a screening program for urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infections based on home sampling with that of a screening program based on conventional swab sampling performed at a physician's office. Female subjects, comprising students at 17 high schools in the county of Aarhus, Denmark, were divided into a study group (tested by home sampling) and a control group (tested in a physician's office). We assessed the number of new infections and the number of subjects who reported being treated for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) at 1 year of follow-up; 443 (51.1%) of 867 women in the intervention group and 487 (58.5%) of 833 women in the control group were available for follow-up. Thirteen (2.9%) and 32 (6.6%) new infections were identified in the intervention group and the control group, respectively (Wilcoxon exact value, P = .026). Nine (2.1%) women in the intervention group and 20 (4.2%) in the control group reported being treated for PID (P = .045), indicating that a screening strategy involving home sampling is associated with a lower prevalence of C. trachomatis and a lower proportion of reported cases of PID.

Journal Article.  3777 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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