Journal Article

<i>Nocardia</i> Infection in Heart-Lung Transplant Recipients at Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, 1989–1998

S. A. Roberts, J. C. Franklin, A. Mijch and D. Spelman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 31, issue 4, pages 968-972
Published in print October 2000 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online October 2000 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/318150
Nocardia Infection in Heart-Lung Transplant Recipients at Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia, 1989–1998

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Nocardia infections are uncommon in recipients of heart, lung, or heart-lung transplants, but such infections are well described. Frequent episodes of rejection, high-dose prednisolone treatment, renal impairment, and prolonged respiratory support have all been shown to increase the risk of Nocardia infection in this group. In this retrospective review of 540 recipients of heart, lung, or heart-lung transplants, 10 patients developed Nocardia infection (frequency, 1.85%). Infection occurred at a mean ± standard deviation of 13 ± 14.5 months after transplantation. All patients had pulmonary disease with no evidence of extrapulmonary disease. The Nocardia infection did not contribute directly to patient deaths. Coinfection with other pathogens was present in 6 patients, and 2 patients had sequential infections. Radiological findings varied. All isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, amikacin, and imipenem. Treatment regimens varied. Two (30%) of 6 patients treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole developed adverse reactions, which necessitated a change in antibiotic therapy. The optimal treatment regimen, which comprises both the antimicrobial agent and the length of treatment, is unclear.

Journal Article.  3382 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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