Journal Article

Linezolid (PNU-100766) versus Vancomycin in the Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Nosocomial Pneumonia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study

Ethan Rubinstein, Sue K. Cammarata, Thomas H. Oliphant and Richard G. Wunderink

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 32, issue 3, pages 402-412
Published in print February 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/318486
Linezolid (PNU-100766) versus Vancomycin in the Treatment of Hospitalized Patients with Nosocomial Pneumonia: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Multicenter Study

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Linezolid, the first oxazolidinone, is active against gram-positive bacteria, including multidrug-resistant strains. This multinational, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial compared the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of linezolid with vancomycin in the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. A total of 203 patients received intravenous linezolid, 600 mg twice daily, plus aztreonam, and 193 patients received vancomycin, 1 g intravenously twice daily, plus aztreonam for 7–21 days. Clinical and microbiological outcomes were evaluated at test of cure 12–28 days after treatment. Clinical cure rates (71 [66.4%] of 107 for linezolid vs. 62 [68.1%] of 91 for vancomycin) and microbiological success rates (36 [67.9%] of 53 vs. 28 [71.8%] of 39, respectively) for evaluable patients were equivalent between treatment groups. Eradication rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and safety evaluations were similar between treatment groups. Resistance to either treatment was not detected. Linezolid is a well-tolerated, effective treatment for adults with gram-positive nosocomial pneumonia.

Journal Article.  7426 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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