Journal Article

Resolution of Organ-Specific Complications of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Children with Use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

Frank T. Saulsbury

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 32, issue 3, pages 464-468
Published in print February 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online February 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/318493
Resolution of Organ-Specific Complications of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Children with Use of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

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Opportunistic infections are a major source of morbidity and mortality in children and adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In addition, organ-specific complications of HIV infection, such as cardiomyopathy, nephropathy, encephalopathy, and others, contribute substantially to the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has produced a dramatic decline in the incidence of opportunistic infections among patients with HIV infection. Nevertheless, there is very little information concerning the value of HAART for organ-specific complications of HIV infection. In this report, we describe 3 children with HIV infection in whom the dominant clinical manifestations were cardiomyopathy, red cell aplasia, and nephropathy. HAART produced a decrease in the HIV ribonucleic acid level, an increase in the CD4 cell count, and resolution of the organ-specific complications in all patients. These cases add to our knowledge concerning the benefits of HAART for children with HIV infection.

Journal Article.  3339 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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