Journal Article

Clinical Presentation and Risk Behaviors of Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Thailand, 1994–1998: Regional Variation and Temporal Trends

Suwat Chariyalertsak, Thira Sirisanthana, Orapan Saengwonloey and Kenrad E. Nelson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 32, issue 6, pages 955-962
Published in print March 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online March 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/319348
Clinical Presentation and Risk Behaviors of Patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome in Thailand, 1994–1998: Regional Variation and Temporal Trends

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From 1994 through 1998, the clinical and demographic features and risk behaviors of 101,945 adolescent and adult patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were reported to the Ministry of Public Health in Thailand. The number of reported cases of AIDS infection increased from 12,005 in 1994 to 24,722 in 1997. Nearly 40% of the cases were reported from the northern provinces, which contained only ∼20% of the adult population. About 80% of cases were among male patients, and 87% had been acquired via sexual contact. Tuberculosis was the most commonly reported opportunistic infection, occurring in 28.9% of patients; it was more commonly reported among injection drug abusers, especially in Bangkok. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and cryptococcal meningitis each occurred in nearly 20% of patients and were more frequently reported in patients with risk factors related to sex than in injection drug abusers. Penicillium marneffei infections were reported in 6.8% of patients from the northern provinces but less frequently elsewhere. These data suggest that AIDS is common in Thailand, and human immunodeficiency virus—infected persons should be given prophylaxis for tuberculosis, fungal infections, and P. carinii pneumonia.

Journal Article.  4176 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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