Journal Article

Concentrations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid after Antiretroviral Treatment Initiated during Primary HIV-1 Infection

Roelien H. Enting, Jan M. Prins, Suzanne Jurriaans, Kees Brinkman, Peter Portegies and Joep M. A. Lange

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 32, issue 7, pages 1095-1099
Published in print April 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online April 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/319602
Concentrations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in Cerebrospinal Fluid after Antiretroviral Treatment Initiated during Primary HIV-1 Infection

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In 6 patients with primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, concentrations of HIV-1 RNA and β2-microglobulin were monitored in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and in plasma during antiretroviral therapy. Four patients had neurological symptoms. At baseline, the CSF of 5 patients had detectable levels of HIV-1 RNA (median, 3.68 log10 copies/mL; range, <2.60–5.67 log10 copies/mL), and the CSF of 3 patients had elevated levels of β2-microglobulin. After 8 weeks of treatment, the median concentrations of HIV-1 RNA in CSF had decreased to <2.60 log10 copies/mL (range, <1.60–3.00 log10 copies/mL; P = .04) and in plasma to 3.07 log10 copies/mL (range, 2.57–3.79 log10 copies/mL; P = .03). Median concentration of β2-microglobulin in CSF had decreased to 1.2 mg/L (range, 0.9–1.7 mg/L; P = .06) and, in plasma, to 1.7 mg/L (range, 1.1–2.2 mg/L; P = .03). After 48 weeks, HIV-1 RNA concentrations in 1 patient were still 1.97 log10 copies/mL in CSF and 1.51 log10 copies/mL in plasma, although β2-microglobulin concentrations in CSF and plasma had normalized after 8 weeks.

Journal Article.  3293 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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