Journal Article

Adenovirus Is a Key Pathogen in Hemorrhagic Cystitis Associated with Bone Marrow Transplantation

Hideki Akiyama, Tetsuya Kurosu, Chizuko Sakashita, Takashi Inoue, Shin-ichiro Mori, Kazuteru Ohashi, Shu Tanikawa, Hisashi Sakamaki, Yasusuke Onozawa, Qin Chen, Huaiying Zheng and Tadaichi Kitamura

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 32, issue 9, pages 1325-1330
Published in print May 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online May 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/319992
Adenovirus Is a Key Pathogen in Hemorrhagic Cystitis Associated with Bone Marrow Transplantation

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Late-onset hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a well-known complication of bone marrow transplantation (BMT) that is mainly attributed to infection with BK virus (BKV) and adenovirus (AdV). From 1986 through 1998, 282 patients underwent BMT, and 45 of them developed HC. Urine samples tested positive for AdV in 26 patients, of which 22 showed virus type 11. Among patients who underwent allogeneic BMT, logistic regression analysis revealed acute graft-versus-host disease (grade, ⩾2) to be the most significant predictive factor for HC (P < .0001). In addition, a total of 193 urine samples regularly obtained from 26 consecutive patients who underwent allogeneic BMT were examined for BKV, JC virus (JCV), and AdV by means of polymerase chain reaction. Of patients without HC, approximately 30% of the specimens tested positive for BKV (58 samples) and JCV (55 samples), whereas 5 (3%) tested positive for AdV. Of the 3 samples obtained from patients with HC, the numbers of positive results for BKV, JCV, and AdV were 3, 1, and 1, respectively; the numbers of positive results increased to 14 of 17, 9 of 17, and 10 of 17, respectively, when we added another 14 samples obtained from 14 patients with HC (P < .0001, P = .026, and P < .0001, respectively). In conclusion, there was significant correlation between AdV and HC in the patients we studied.

Journal Article.  3502 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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