Journal Article

Immunopathogenesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Immune-Based Therapies

Irini Sereti and H. Clifford Lane

Edited by Kenneth H. Mayer

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 32, issue 12, pages 1738-1755
Published in print June 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online June 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/320758
Immunopathogenesis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Immune-Based Therapies

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Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to a state of CD4 lymphopenia and generalized immune activation with subsequent development of opportunistic infections and neoplasms. The use of highly active antiretroviral treatment has dramatically improved the clinical outcome for HIV-infected patients, but the associated cost and toxicity and the eventual development of drug resistance have underscored the need for additional therapeutic strategies. Immune-based therapies, such as treatment with cytokines or immunosuppressants, adoptive immunotherapy, and therapeutic immunizations, are being intensely investigated as potential supplements to antiretroviral therapy. Although much data have been generated as a result of these efforts, to date there has been little evidence of the clinical efficacy of these strategies. Randomized clinical studies remain critical in evaluating the clinical significance and the role of immune-based therapies in the therapeutic armamentarium against HIV.

Journal Article.  15015 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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