Journal Article

Longitudinal Study of Bacterial, Viral, and Fungal Infections in Adult Recipients of Bone Marrow Transplants

E. Ninin, N. Milpied, P. Moreau, B. André-Richet, N. Morineau, B. Mahé, M. Vigier, B.-M. Imbert, O. Morin, J.-L. Harousseau and H. Richet

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 1, pages 41-47
Published in print July 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/320871
Longitudinal Study of Bacterial, Viral, and Fungal Infections in Adult Recipients of Bone Marrow Transplants

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The epidemiology of infections was studied in a retrospective cohort of 446 recipients of bone marrow transplants (BMTs; 92 of which were allogeneic and 354 of which were autologous) during 1993–1996. Infections that were microbiologically documented in 274 recipients included bacteremia, urinary tract infections, cytomegalovirus viremia, fungemia, invasive aspergillosis, and catheter-related infections. During the period of neutropenia, no differences were found between recipients of allogeneic BMTs and recipients of autologous BMTs with regard to the incidence and the nature of infection. After patients underwent engraftment, bacteremia, cytomegalovirus viremia, and invasive aspergillosis were significantly more common in recipients of allogeneic BMTs than in recipients of autologous BMTs. Deaths caused by infection were uncommon and were mainly the result of invasive aspergillosis. Therefore, empirical antimicrobial therapy should be the same for recipients of both allogeneic and autologous BMTs during the period of neutropenia; after engraftment, more attention should be paid to the risk of infection in allogeneic BMT recipients, particularly with regard to detection and prevention of invasive aspergillosis.

Journal Article.  4591 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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