Journal Article

Pathways for Inappropriate Dispensing of Antibiotics for Rhinosinusitis: A Randomized Trial

Despina G. Contopoulos-Ioannidis, Ioanna D. Koliofoti, Ioanna C. Koutroumpa, Ioannis A. Giannakakis and John P. A. Ioannidis

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 1, pages 76-82
Published in print July 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/320888
Pathways for Inappropriate Dispensing of Antibiotics for Rhinosinusitis: A Randomized Trial

More Like This

Show all results sharing these subjects:

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Immunology
  • Public Health and Epidemiology
  • Microbiology

GO

Show Summary Details

Preview

We evaluated the extent of and factors that determine the inappropriate use of antibiotics that are obtained without a physician's prescription. Ninety-eight Greek pharmacists were visited by actress-researchers whoplayed clients requesting antibiotics without a physician's prescription. Pharmacists were randomly challenged in a scenario that involved simulated cases of acute uncomplicated rhinosinusitis with either low fever (38.5°C) or high fever (40°C). Antibiotics were offered by 34 (69%) of 49 pharmacists who were presented with the high-fever scenario and by 42 (86%) of 49 pharmacists who were presented with the low-fever scenario (risk difference, 16.3%;). Thirty-two (65%) and 35 (71%) pharmacists in the high- and low-fever study arms, P=.05 respectively, agreed to sell the actress-researchers broad-spectrum antibiotics. Only 28 (57%) and 17 (35%) pharmacists, respectively, recommended that the patient visit a physician (P=.03). Inappropriate recommendations regarding antibiotic use were very common in the studied setting. Antibiotics were more likely to be offered to persons who did not have a prescription when they were less likely to be clinically indicated.

Journal Article.  4122 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

Full text: subscription required

How to subscribe Recommend to my Librarian

Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content. Please, subscribe or login to access all content.