Journal Article

Epidemiology of Infections after Solid-Organ Transplantation

David R. Snydman

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue Supplement_1, pages S5-S8
Published in print July 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/320897
Epidemiology of Infections after Solid-Organ Transplantation

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Infections are a major determinant of the outcome of solid-organ transplantation. Their incidence varies because of a number of factors. The type of organ transplanted, the degree of immunosuppression, the need for additional antirejection therapy, and the occurrence of technical or surgical complications all affect the incidence of infection after transplantation. There are 3 general time frames to consider. In the first month, bacterial and candidal infections predominate. From the second through the sixth months, infections “classically” associated with transplantation become manifest. Beyond the sixth month, the clinical course is largely determined by the presence or absence of chronic rejection.

Journal Article.  2379 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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