Journal Article

Treating Cardiovascular Disease with Antimicrobial Agents: A Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Physicians in the United States

Francisco Gimenez-Sanchez, Jay C. Butler, Daniel B. Jernigan, Larry J. Strausbaugh, Catherine C. Slemp, Mindy J. Perilla and Scott F. Dowell

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue 2, pages 171-176
Published in print July 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online July 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/321810
Treating Cardiovascular Disease with Antimicrobial Agents: A Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Physicians in the United States

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To assess physicians' knowledge, attitudes, and prescribing behaviors with regard to the association between Chlamydia pneumoniae and cardiovascular disease, we surveyed 750 physicians in Alaska, 1172 in West Virginia, and 569 infectious disease (ID) specialists in a nationwide network during February–May 1999. Eighty-five percent knew of the association between C. pneumoniae and atherosclerosis, but this awareness was more common among ID specialists and cardiologists than among generalists (96% vs. 77%; P < .001). Knowledge scores were significantly higher among ID specialists and cardiologists (P < .001) and among physicians who saw relatively more patients who had myocardial infarction and/or were at risk of atherosclerotic disease. Four percent of physicians had treated or recommended treating cardiovascular diseases with antimicrobial agents; this percentage was significantly higher among cardiologists, physicians who empirically treat patients with peptic ulcers with antimicrobial agents, and physicians with a relatively high knowledge score.

Journal Article.  2424 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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