Journal Article

In Vitro Models, In Vivo Models, and Pharmacokinetics: What Can We Learn from In Vitro Models?

Alasdair MacGowan, Chris Rogers and Karen Bowker

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue Supplement_3, pages S214-S220
Published in print September 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1086/321850
In Vitro Models, In Vivo Models, and Pharmacokinetics: What Can We Learn from In Vitro Models?

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  • Immunology
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In vitro pharmacokinetic models of infection can make an important contribution to the study of the pharmacodynamic properties of an antibacterial agent. In conjunction with animal and human pharmacodynamic evaluations, they provide data to allow for the optimization of drug dosing regimens. In vitro models can be used simply to describe the effect of a drug on a bacterial population as well as to provide data for more-analytical studies, including hypothesis testing. Analytical study designs provide information on the pharmacodynamic parameter best related to the chosen outcome, as well as its magnitude. Factors such as the characteristics of the model (method of drug removal, inoculum density, and growth phase), doses simulated, species and susceptibility range of bacteria, and methods and analytical tools used to measure antibacterial effect will have an effect on the conclusions drawn. In vitro models have an important future role in ensuring antibiotic efficacy and in reducing the risks of resistance.

Journal Article.  4573 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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