Journal Article

Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Rates in the United States, 1992–1998: The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System Basic SSI Risk Index

Robert P. Gaynes, David H. Culver, Teresa C. Horan, Jonathan R. Edwards, Chesley Richards and James S. Tolson

in Clinical Infectious Diseases

Published on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America

Volume 33, issue Supplement_2, pages S69-S77
Published in print September 2001 | ISSN: 1058-4838
Published online September 2001 | e-ISSN: 1537-6591 | DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/321860
Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Rates in the United States, 1992–1998: The National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System Basic SSI Risk Index

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By use of the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System's surgical patient surveillance component protocol, the NNIS basic risk index was examined to predict the risk of a surgical site infection (SSI). The NNIS basic SSI risk index is composed of the following criteria: American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3, 4, or 5; wound class; and duration of surgery. The effect when a laparoscope was used was also determined. Overall, for 34 of the 44 NNIS procedure categories, SSI rates increased significantly (P < .05) with the number of risk factors present. With regard to cholecystectomy and colon surgery, the SSI rate was significantly lower when the procedure was done laparoscopically within each risk index category. With regard to appendectomy and gastric surgery, use of a laparoscope affected SSI rates only when no other risk factors were present. The NNIS basic SSI index is useful for risk adjustment for a wide variety of procedures. For 4 operations, the use of a laparoscope lowered SSI risk, requiring modification of the NNIS basic SSI risk index.

Journal Article.  5041 words.  Illustrated.

Subjects: Infectious Diseases ; Immunology ; Public Health and Epidemiology ; Microbiology

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